Clash of the Campers—What's Your Camper's Personality?

It’s time to sign up for camp . . . what type of camper do you have?

Parenting sometimes feels like an endless array of choices: will you breast feed or bottle feed? Will the kids attend public school or private school? How much screen time should they get? Which pediatrician should you use? Is high fructose corn syrup going to kill us all?

Then summer rolls around and things get more intense.

In a perfect world, we parents would get a summer break right along with the kids. We’d spend the summer reading and swimming and hiking and definitely not thinking about adult responsibilities. The reality for most of us, though, is that we have to work and the kids need places that will keep them safe, busy and happy.

With hundreds of camps all over Maryland, and kids who have a wide array of interests, it can be intimidating to figure out where your kids will want to spend their summer and where you want to spend your hard-earned money.

Before you start panicking and filling our registration forms willy-nilly, think about what type of kid you’ve got and what kind of things they’d like to do. Whether they love soccer, spend their time immersed in the world of video games, or are the class math whiz—it’s best for the both of you if you match them up with a camp that they will enjoy.

We’ve done some of the work for you. We assessed some kid personalities, then waded into the sea of camp listings out there and suggested camps for some of each type of camper kid: Mini Monets, Glampers (also known as Glam-campers), the All-Star, Techie Tweens, the Sleep-Away Super Camper, the Trendsetter, and the Star in the Making.

Once you figure out what kind of camper you’ve got, you can check out our Camp Directory on page 20. Plus, you can find even more camps, and information about the camp experience, at Chesapeake Family Life online, ChesapeakeFamily.com/camp.

 

Star in the Makingdirector

These are the kids who turn every hairbrush into a microphone and every mirror into an adoring crowd. There was never any doubt—in their minds at least—that they are destined to be the next Beyoncé. Let your little stars shine as they learn to put on a play or belt out a tune. Or let them learn to take their talents online to become YouTube stars.

Belt it Like Broadway, Baltimore
enrole.com/umbc
Learn to sing your favorite Broadway songs with power and finesse! Grades 6–12.

Rising Stars, Columbia
campofthearts.com
Campers will rotate between acting, music, dance and art classes, culminating in a final production. Grades 1–8.

Rock 101, Baltimore
schoolofrock.com
Beginners ages 7–12 will explore instruments through musical games and activities.

Star Makers, Bowie
starmakersdancedc.com
Experienced instructors teach tap, jazz, ballet, hip hop and modern dance. Ages 5–12.

Ukelele and Singing Camp, Annapolis
naptownsings.com
Students will take group ukulele and singing lessons, then use their skills in an awesome sing and play along. Ages 7–13.

YouTube Stars, Crofton
pongoslearninglab.com
Kids will learn video production skills, including how to story-board, script, record and edit videos.



fashinistaThe Glamper

Future Project Runway contestants gotta start somewhere. Send your kid to one of these camps if they can’t leave for the bus stop with a *look* for each day of school. These camps are for your future designers who want to learn to sew, develop an eye for beauty, and create outfits for their dolls.

Accessorize Your Room, Annapolis
keyschool.org
Create fun accessories and accent pieces to jazz up bedroom décor. Campers grades 3–6 will craft decorative table lamps, picture frames, and wall art.

American Girl Doll Design Time, Severna Park
stmartinsmd.org
Learn to make unicorn squishies, trendy tote bags and other accessories for your American Girl doll design. Ages 6–8.

Bedazzled by Beads, Columbia
howardcc.edu
Kids ages 8–10 can create with beads, metal and string, turning the ordinary into stunning, wearable art.

Camp Divalicious Girls, Capitol Heights
camp.mygirlfriendshouse.org
Learn to sew, sketch, and show off your designs in a fashion show. Ages 10–16.

 

Sleep-Away Super Camper

Some children are born for the great outdoors. These are the kids whittling sticks all winter long, insisting on s’mores for dessert every night, and dragging you along on nature hikes whatever the weather. These camps let kids like yours stretch their wings at a sleepaway camp where they can commune with, uh, similar-minded children and make friendship bracelets to their heart’s content.

Arrowhead Woods Overnight Camp, Manchester
rivervalleyranch.com
The perfect introduction to sleep-away camp. Features bunk beds, pow wow fire pit, and dining facility. Ages 7–9.

Camp Wabanna, Edgewater
campwabanna.org
Residential campers take part in Bible study, kayaking, swimming, and all the fun of traditional summer camp.

Grandparents Camp, Churchton
bwccampsandretreats.com
Multi-generaltional week brings together campers and grandparents with sailing, swimming, and arts and crafts.

 

The All-Starsportyspice

Your kid: has a closet full of sports gear, a wide range of friends from a variety of sports teams, and an intense need to watch obscure games on ESPN. These camps: ready and willing to push your kid to the max. There are camps for kids looking to be the next Serena Williams or Tom Brady, of course, but also camps for kids just looking to have fun. Either way, be prepared to pick your kid up tired but very happy.

All Sports Camp, Annapolis
navysports.com
Boys and girls in grades 5–8 can learn a variety of sports as part of this comprehensive program.

Annapolis Junior Rowing Association Learn to Row Camp, Annapolis
annapolisjuniorrowing.com
Learn boat handling, rowing technique, and more at this made-for-serious-athletes camp. For students entering grades 8–12.

En-tice-ment Stables Equestrian Camp, Harwood
enticementstables.com
Campers ages 5–18 will learn about riding horses, as well as horse care, tack care, and showmanship.

US Martial Arts, Glen Burnie
usmamd.com
Campers learn Yoga, Taekwondo, and more, as well as go on trips.

Weber’s Bulldog Basketball Camp, Annapolis
webersbulldogbasketball.com
Open to all skill levels. Kids ages 6–14 learn basketball fundamentals in a structured setting.



techTechie Tweens

It’s obvious pretty early if your kid is a STEM kid. These are kids who are masters at whipping up slime. They are always happy to get tech toys for Christmas because they can’t wait to take them apart and then put them back together. And, of course, towering LEGO creations go without question.

App Attack! Columbia
howardcc.edu
Campers can design and customize their own game app, learn the basics of mobile app design and game development. No prior experience necessary. Ages 6–17.

How Girls Code, Baltimore
umbcretrievers.com
Empowers girls to explore the worlds of computer science and robotics. Grades 3–9.

Terrapin STEM Camp, Laurel
terrapinstem.com
Learn about all aspects of STEM—from discovering how magnets work to creating rockets. Grades 6–8.

Jr. Chemist, Severna Park
stmartinsmd.org
Campers will create wacky concoctions, blob explosions, funny putty, and more. Ages 3.5–5.


MUGGLETrendsetters

These trendsetting, pop culture kids have every book of every series . . . and they’ve seen the movies, too. You know the type. They are the ones who seem to speak another language, can’t stop talking about Hogwarts, or Percy Jackson, Star Wars, or whatever else has captured their attention. Give them the chance to geek out with some kids of their own age with the following camps.

Harry Potter Magical Engineering, Arnold
aacc.edu
Explore the magic of Harry Potter using LEGOs. Travel to a world of wizardry and hone your magical skills while learning about Muggle STEM concepts.

Hogwarts Experience, Columbia
howardcc.edu
Participants ages 11–17 will enroll in the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. They will learn potion making, quidditch and magical crafts.

Hogwarts School of Culinary Magic, Severna Park
stmartinsmd.org
Relive the excitement of Harry Potter’s adventures with magical magical treats, snacks and potions.
Ages 9–12.

 

Mini Monetsart

Not all kids fit into a neat little box, and sometimes kids with a predisposition for the arts can struggle in school, where time constraints can mean there isn’t much room for creativity. However, summer can be the perfect time to engage your aspiring artist, who is always doodling, sculpting, painting or drawing.

Art-Ability, Severna Park
severnschool.com
Campers will learn calligraphy, drawing and design, how to make prints and get to enjoy the outdoors while painting landscapes. Grades 5–9.

Summer Art Camp, Towson
towson.edu
Kids of all abilities can create art, including 2D, 3D, and digital experience workshops. Program sessions end with an exhibition. Ages 6–14.

Architecture Summer Camp, Baltimore
thewalters.org
Learn about ancient aqueducts, elaborate columns and flying buttresses. Campers will observe the way buildings are depicted in the museum’s collection and create their own structures. Grades 1–5.

 

The Eco-Warriortug

These kids wade into the mud, catch creepy crawlies, and live to explore the outdoors. These are the kids catching frogs, ants, moths, whatever . . . and keeping them for pets. These are the kids who know that learning is always better when you can make a mess while you’re doing it. These are the kids who, let’s be honest, will definitely change this planet for the better when it’s all said and done.

Art in Nature Camp, Monkton
ladewgardens.com 
Campers ages 9–12 will take part in hikes and outdoor activities. They will also explore genres like painting and sculpture and use recycled and natural materials to create art.

Camp Ultimate, Annapolis
creativecri.org
Learn about science, crabbing, fishing and hunt for bugs and fossils. Ages 8–13.

Catch of the Day, Annapolis
amaritime.org
Kids in kindergarten and first grade will wade in the creek, hunt for bugs under logs, and search for tadpoles—all to learn about the animals that call the Chesapeake Bay home.

Into the WILD Nature Camp, Lothian
jugbay.org
Campers will paddle the river, wade through the marsh, and explore an archaeological site to learn research skills. Ages 13–15.

—Lisa Snowden-McCray
—Illustrated by Keegan Cardoza

 

© 2018 Chesapeake Family Life. All Rights Reserved.